WANG Jinzhu, GAO Ming, HE Xinhua, ZHANG Qian, Natamba LEO, XU Chang. Evaluation of Potential Productivity of Woody Energy Crops on Marginal Land in China[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2017, 27(6): 963-973. doi: 10.1007/s11769-017-0916-4
Citation: WANG Jinzhu, GAO Ming, HE Xinhua, ZHANG Qian, Natamba LEO, XU Chang. Evaluation of Potential Productivity of Woody Energy Crops on Marginal Land in China[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2017, 27(6): 963-973. doi: 10.1007/s11769-017-0916-4

Evaluation of Potential Productivity of Woody Energy Crops on Marginal Land in China

doi: 10.1007/s11769-017-0916-4
Funds:  Under the auspices of National Science and Technology Support Project of China (No. 2013BAJ11B02)
More Information
  • Corresponding author: GAO Ming.E-mail:gaoming@swu.edu.cn
  • Received Date: 2016-12-05
  • Rev Recd Date: 2017-02-20
  • Publish Date: 2017-12-27
  • Energy crops are a basic material in the bioenergy industry, and they can also mitigate carbon emissions and have environmental benefits when planted on marginal lands. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential productivity of energy crops on marginal lands in China. A mechanistic model, combined with energy crop and land use characteristics, and meteorological and soil parameters, was used to simulate the potential productivity of energy crops. There were three main results. 1) The total marginal land in China was determined to be 104.78×106 ha. The 400-mm precipitation boundary line, which is the dividing line between the semi-humid and semi-arid zones in China, also divided the marginal land into shrub land and sparse forest land in the southeast and bare land, bare rock land, and saline alkali land in the northeast. 2) The total area of the marginal land suitable for planting energy crops was determined to be 55.82×106 ha, with Xanthoceras sorbifolia and Cerasus humilis mainly grown in the northern China, Jatropha curcas and Cornus wilsoniana mainly grown in the southwest and southeast, and Pistacia chinensis mainly grown in the central area, while also having a northeast-southwest zonal distribution. 3) Taking the highest yield in overlapping areas, the potential productivity of target energy crops was determined to be 32.63×106 t/yr. Without considering the overlapping areas, the potential productivity was 6.81×106 t/yr from X. sorbifolia, 8.86×106 t/yr from C. humilis, 7.18×106 t/yr from J. curcas, 9.55×106 t/yr from P. chinensis, and 7.78×106 t/yr from C. wilsoniana.
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Evaluation of Potential Productivity of Woody Energy Crops on Marginal Land in China

doi: 10.1007/s11769-017-0916-4
Funds:  Under the auspices of National Science and Technology Support Project of China (No. 2013BAJ11B02)
    Corresponding author: GAO Ming.E-mail:gaoming@swu.edu.cn

Abstract: Energy crops are a basic material in the bioenergy industry, and they can also mitigate carbon emissions and have environmental benefits when planted on marginal lands. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential productivity of energy crops on marginal lands in China. A mechanistic model, combined with energy crop and land use characteristics, and meteorological and soil parameters, was used to simulate the potential productivity of energy crops. There were three main results. 1) The total marginal land in China was determined to be 104.78×106 ha. The 400-mm precipitation boundary line, which is the dividing line between the semi-humid and semi-arid zones in China, also divided the marginal land into shrub land and sparse forest land in the southeast and bare land, bare rock land, and saline alkali land in the northeast. 2) The total area of the marginal land suitable for planting energy crops was determined to be 55.82×106 ha, with Xanthoceras sorbifolia and Cerasus humilis mainly grown in the northern China, Jatropha curcas and Cornus wilsoniana mainly grown in the southwest and southeast, and Pistacia chinensis mainly grown in the central area, while also having a northeast-southwest zonal distribution. 3) Taking the highest yield in overlapping areas, the potential productivity of target energy crops was determined to be 32.63×106 t/yr. Without considering the overlapping areas, the potential productivity was 6.81×106 t/yr from X. sorbifolia, 8.86×106 t/yr from C. humilis, 7.18×106 t/yr from J. curcas, 9.55×106 t/yr from P. chinensis, and 7.78×106 t/yr from C. wilsoniana.

WANG Jinzhu, GAO Ming, HE Xinhua, ZHANG Qian, Natamba LEO, XU Chang. Evaluation of Potential Productivity of Woody Energy Crops on Marginal Land in China[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2017, 27(6): 963-973. doi: 10.1007/s11769-017-0916-4
Citation: WANG Jinzhu, GAO Ming, HE Xinhua, ZHANG Qian, Natamba LEO, XU Chang. Evaluation of Potential Productivity of Woody Energy Crops on Marginal Land in China[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2017, 27(6): 963-973. doi: 10.1007/s11769-017-0916-4
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