WANG Chengjin, César DUCRUET, WANG Wei. Port Integration in China: Temporal Pathways, Spatial Patterns and Dynamics[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2015, 25(5): 612-628. doi: 10.1007/s11769-015-0752-3
Citation: WANG Chengjin, César DUCRUET, WANG Wei. Port Integration in China: Temporal Pathways, Spatial Patterns and Dynamics[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2015, 25(5): 612-628. doi: 10.1007/s11769-015-0752-3

Port Integration in China: Temporal Pathways, Spatial Patterns and Dynamics

doi: 10.1007/s11769-015-0752-3
Funds:  Under the auspices of National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41171108), Key Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. KZZD-EW-06-02), Exploratory Forefront Project for the Strategic Science Plan in IGSNRR, CAS (No. 2012QY004)
More Information
  • Corresponding author: WANG Chengjin.E-mail:cjwang@igsnrr.ac.cn
  • Received Date: 2014-03-21
  • Rev Recd Date: 2014-07-11
  • Publish Date: 2015-05-27
  • Over the past two decades, numerous ports located in China have participated in port integration strategies, thus influencing the entire port system. The current research is initiated in order to examine the nature of port integration in China, including associated temporal pathways, spatial patterns and dynamics. Results indicate that port integration in China has been characterized by a significant increase at the turn of the 21st century, comprising thirteen distinguishable pathways typified by differing dynamics, particularly between the northern and southern ports. Pathways were found to include 44 seaports and river ports, chiefly concentrated in the Bohai Rim, Yangtze (Changjiang) River Delta, Beibu Gulf and the southeastern Fujian, thus representing significant spatial regions. Categorically larger seaports have become the primary beneficiaries of port integration. Integration cases were divided into four categories based upon quantified dynamic magnitude including the government-driven mode, market-driven mode, government/market-driven mode and strategic alliance, and into five further categories based upon spatial extent including port internal integration, jurisdictional port integration, port integration across neighbor region, regional port integration and hub-feeder port integration. Results suggest that several factors have effectively driven port integration in China, including legislative tools and spatial planning, optimization of shoreline resources and port functionality, and port competition with the same hinterland.
  • [1] Airriess C A, 2001. The regionalization of Hutchison Port Holdings in Mainland China. Journal of Transport Geography, 9(4): 267-278. doi:  10.1016/S0966-6923(01)00020-5
    [2] Cao Youhui, Mao Hanying, Xu Gang, 2001. The functional structure of the lower Changjiang River Port System. Scientia Geographical Sinica, 56(5): 590-598. (in Chinese)
    [3] Chen Hang, Luan Weixin, Wang Yuewei, 2005. Coordinate development of seaport cluster around Bohai Sea. Ocean Development and Management, (2): 66-71. (in Chinese)
    [4] China Transportation & Communications Press, 2014. The Year Book of Chinese Transportation (2013). Beijing: China Transportation & Communications Press.
    [5] Comtois C, Slack B, 2000. Terminaux de transport et grande re′gion urbaine: L'inte′gration de Hong Kong dansles performances de la Chine. Perspectives Chinoises, 58(2): 12-20. doi:  10.3406/perch.2000.2479
    [6] Cullinane K, Teng Y H, Wang T F, 2005. Port competition between Shanghai and Ningbo. Maritime Policy & Management, 32(4): 331-346.
    [7] Ducruet C, van der Horst M, 2009. Transport integration at European ports: measuring the role and position of intermediaries. European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research, 9(2): 121-142.
    [8] Givoni M, Banister D, 2006. Airline and railway integration. Transport Policy, 13(5): 386-397. doi: 10.1016/j.tra.2013.01. 014
    [9] Han Zenglin, An Xiaopeng, Wang Li et al., 2002. Distribution and optimization of container transport network in China. Scientica Geographical Sinica, 57(4): 479-488. (in Chinese)
    [10] Heaver T D, 1995. The implications of increased competition among ports for port policy and management. Maritime Policy and Management, 22(2): 125-133. doi: 10.1080/0308883950 0000045
    [11] Hoshino H, 2010. Competition and collaboration among container ports. The Asian Journal of Shipping and Logistics, 26(1): 31-48. doi:  10.1016/S2092-5212(10)80010-0
    [12] Junior G A D S, Beresford A K C, Pettit S J, 2003. Liner shipping companies and terminal operators: internationalization or globalization? Maritime Economics & Logistics, 5(4): 393-412. doi:  10.1057/Palgrave.mel.9100088
    [13] Lam J S L, Yap W Y, 2011. Dynamics of liner shipping network and port connectivity in supply chain systems: analysis on East Asia. Journal of Transport Geography, 16(6): 1272-1281. doi:  10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2011.06.007
    [14] Lee S Y, Rodrigue J P, 2006. Trade reorientation and its effects on regional port systems: the Korea-China link along the Yellow Sea Rim. Growth and Change, 37(4): 597-619. doi:  10.1111/j.1468-2257.2006.00342.X
    [15] Li J B, Oh Y S, 2010. A research on competition and cooperation between Shanghai port and Ningbo-Zhoushan port. The Asian Journal of Shipping and Logistics, 26(1): 67-92. doi:  10.1016/S2092-5212(10)80012-4
    [16] Notteboom T E, 2002. Consolidation and contestability in the European container handling industry. Maritime Policy & Management, 29(3): 257-269. doi: 10.1080/0308883021013 2614
    [17] Notteboom T E, Rodrigue J P, 2008. Containerisation, box logistics and global supply chains: the integration of ports and liner shipping networks. Maritime Economics & Logistics, 10(1): 152-174. doi:  10.1057/Palgrave.mel.9100196
    [18] Notteboom T E, Rodrigue J P, 2012. The corporate geography of global container terminal operators. Maritime Policy and Management, 39(3): 249-279. doi: 10.1080/03088839.2012. 671970
    [19] Notteboom T E, Winkelmans W, 2001. Structural changes in logistics: How will port authorities face the challenge? Maritime Policy and Management, 28(1): 71-89. doi: 10.1080/ 03088830119197
    [20] Pallis A A, Notteboom T E, De Langen P W, 2008. Concession agreements and market entry in the container terminal industry. Maritime Economics & Logistics, 10(3): 209-228. doi:  10.1057/mel.2008.1
    [21] Rodrigue J P, 2003. The port authority of New York and New Jersey: Global changes, regional gains and local challenges in port development. Les Cahiers Scientifiques du Transport, (44): 55-75. doi:  10.1111/j.0033-0124.1988.00288.x
    [22] Slack B, Fr′emont A, 2005. Transformation of port terminal operations: from the local to the global. Transport Reviews, 25(1): 117-130. doi:  10.1080/0144164042000206051
    [23] Slack B, Wang J J, 2002. The challenge of peripheral ports: an Asian perspective. GeoJournal, 56(2): 159-166. doi: 10.1016/ S0966-6923(02)00003-0
    [24] Song D W, 2002. Regional port competition and co-operation: The case of Hong Kong and South China. Journal of Transport Geography, 10(2): 99-110. doi: 10.1016/S0966-6923(02) 00003-0
    [25] Song D W, Panayides P M, 2008. Global supply chain and port/terminal: Integration and competitiveness. Maritime Policy & Management, 35(1): 73-87. doi: 10.1080/03088830701 848953
    [26] Stubbs J, Jegede F, 1998. The integration of rail and air transport in Britain. Journal of Transport Geography, 6(1): 53-67. doi:  10.1016/S0966-6923(97)00039-2
    [27] Veenstra A, Notteboom T E, 2011. The development of the Yangtze River container port system. Journal of Transport Geography, 19(4): 772-781. doi: 10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2010. 09.006
    [28] Wang Chengjin, Ducruet C, 2012. New port development and global city making: emergence of the Shanghai-Yangshan multilayered gateway hub. Journal of Transport Geography, 25(6): 58-69. doi:  10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2012.07.008
    [29] Wang J J, 1998. A container load center with a developing hinterland: a case study of Hong Kong. Journal of Transport Geography, 6(3): 187-201. doi:  10.1016/S0966-6923(98)00011-8
    [30] Wang J J, Michael CC, 2010. From a hub port city to a global supply chain management center: a case study of Hong Kong. Journal of Transport Geography, (18): 104-115. doi: 10. 1016/j.jtrangeo.2009.02.009
    [31] Wang J J, Ng A K Y, Olivier D, 2004. Port governance in China: a review of policies in an era of internationalizing port management practices. Transport Policy, 11(3): 237-250. doi:  10.1016/j.tranpol.2003.11.003
    [32] Wang J J, Olivier D, Notteboom T E et al., 2007. Ports, Cities, and Global Supply Chains. Ashgate, Aldershot.
    [33] Wang J J, Slack B, 2000. The evolution of a regional container port system: the Pearl River Delta. Journal of Transport Geography, 8(4): 263-275. doi:  10.1016/S0966-6923(00)00013-2
    [34] Wang Renxiang, 2008. Strategy of port resource integration in China-case of Ningbo-Zhoushan. Economic Geography, 28(5): 872-875. (in Chinese)
  • 加载中
通讯作者: 陈斌, bchen63@163.com
  • 1. 

    沈阳化工大学材料科学与工程学院 沈阳 110142

  1. 本站搜索
  2. 百度学术搜索
  3. 万方数据库搜索
  4. CNKI搜索

Article Metrics

Article views(350) PDF downloads(1247) Cited by()

Proportional views
Related

Port Integration in China: Temporal Pathways, Spatial Patterns and Dynamics

doi: 10.1007/s11769-015-0752-3
Funds:  Under the auspices of National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41171108), Key Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. KZZD-EW-06-02), Exploratory Forefront Project for the Strategic Science Plan in IGSNRR, CAS (No. 2012QY004)
    Corresponding author: WANG Chengjin.E-mail:cjwang@igsnrr.ac.cn

Abstract: Over the past two decades, numerous ports located in China have participated in port integration strategies, thus influencing the entire port system. The current research is initiated in order to examine the nature of port integration in China, including associated temporal pathways, spatial patterns and dynamics. Results indicate that port integration in China has been characterized by a significant increase at the turn of the 21st century, comprising thirteen distinguishable pathways typified by differing dynamics, particularly between the northern and southern ports. Pathways were found to include 44 seaports and river ports, chiefly concentrated in the Bohai Rim, Yangtze (Changjiang) River Delta, Beibu Gulf and the southeastern Fujian, thus representing significant spatial regions. Categorically larger seaports have become the primary beneficiaries of port integration. Integration cases were divided into four categories based upon quantified dynamic magnitude including the government-driven mode, market-driven mode, government/market-driven mode and strategic alliance, and into five further categories based upon spatial extent including port internal integration, jurisdictional port integration, port integration across neighbor region, regional port integration and hub-feeder port integration. Results suggest that several factors have effectively driven port integration in China, including legislative tools and spatial planning, optimization of shoreline resources and port functionality, and port competition with the same hinterland.

WANG Chengjin, César DUCRUET, WANG Wei. Port Integration in China: Temporal Pathways, Spatial Patterns and Dynamics[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2015, 25(5): 612-628. doi: 10.1007/s11769-015-0752-3
Citation: WANG Chengjin, César DUCRUET, WANG Wei. Port Integration in China: Temporal Pathways, Spatial Patterns and Dynamics[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2015, 25(5): 612-628. doi: 10.1007/s11769-015-0752-3
Reference (34)

Catalog

    /

    DownLoad:  Full-Size Img  PowerPoint
    Return
    Return