MA Haitao, FANG Chuanglin, PANG Bo, WANG Shaojian. Structure of Chinese City Network as Driven by Technological Knowledge Flows[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2015, 25(4): 498-510. doi: 10.1007/s11769-014-0731-0
Citation: MA Haitao, FANG Chuanglin, PANG Bo, WANG Shaojian. Structure of Chinese City Network as Driven by Technological Knowledge Flows[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2015, 25(4): 498-510. doi: 10.1007/s11769-014-0731-0

Structure of Chinese City Network as Driven by Technological Knowledge Flows

doi: 10.1007/s11769-014-0731-0
Funds:  Under the auspices of Major Project of National Social Science Foundation of China (No. 13&ZD027), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41201128, 71433008)
More Information
  • Corresponding author: FANG Chuanglin. E-mail: fangcl@igsnrr.ac.cn
  • Received Date: 2014-04-28
  • Rev Recd Date: 2014-08-11
  • Publish Date: 2015-04-27
  • Based on patent cooperation data, this study used a range of city network analysis approaches in order to explore the structure of the Chinese city network which is driven by technological knowledge flows. The results revealed the spatial structure, composition structure, hierarchical structure, group structure, and control structure of Chinese city network, as well as its dynamic factors. The major findings are: 1) the spatial pattern presents a diamond structure, in which Wuhan is the central city; 2) although the invention patent knowledge network is the main part of the broader inter-city innovative cooperation network, it is weaker than the utility model patent; 3) as the senior level cities, Beijing, Shanghai and the cities in the Zhujiang (Pearl) River Delta Region show a strong capability of both spreading and controlling technological knowledge; 4) whilst a national technology alliance has preliminarily formed, regional alliances have not been adequately established; 5) even though the cooperation level amongst weak connection cities is not high, such cities still play an important role in the network as a result of their location within 'structural holes' in the network; and 6) the major driving forces facilitating inter-city technological cooperation are geographical proximity, hierarchical proximity and technological proximity.
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Structure of Chinese City Network as Driven by Technological Knowledge Flows

doi: 10.1007/s11769-014-0731-0
Funds:  Under the auspices of Major Project of National Social Science Foundation of China (No. 13&ZD027), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41201128, 71433008)
    Corresponding author: FANG Chuanglin. E-mail: fangcl@igsnrr.ac.cn

Abstract: Based on patent cooperation data, this study used a range of city network analysis approaches in order to explore the structure of the Chinese city network which is driven by technological knowledge flows. The results revealed the spatial structure, composition structure, hierarchical structure, group structure, and control structure of Chinese city network, as well as its dynamic factors. The major findings are: 1) the spatial pattern presents a diamond structure, in which Wuhan is the central city; 2) although the invention patent knowledge network is the main part of the broader inter-city innovative cooperation network, it is weaker than the utility model patent; 3) as the senior level cities, Beijing, Shanghai and the cities in the Zhujiang (Pearl) River Delta Region show a strong capability of both spreading and controlling technological knowledge; 4) whilst a national technology alliance has preliminarily formed, regional alliances have not been adequately established; 5) even though the cooperation level amongst weak connection cities is not high, such cities still play an important role in the network as a result of their location within 'structural holes' in the network; and 6) the major driving forces facilitating inter-city technological cooperation are geographical proximity, hierarchical proximity and technological proximity.

MA Haitao, FANG Chuanglin, PANG Bo, WANG Shaojian. Structure of Chinese City Network as Driven by Technological Knowledge Flows[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2015, 25(4): 498-510. doi: 10.1007/s11769-014-0731-0
Citation: MA Haitao, FANG Chuanglin, PANG Bo, WANG Shaojian. Structure of Chinese City Network as Driven by Technological Knowledge Flows[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2015, 25(4): 498-510. doi: 10.1007/s11769-014-0731-0
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