MUKHERJEE Nabanita, SIDDIQUE Giyasuddin, BASAK Aritra, ROY Arindam, MANDAL Mehedi Hasan. Climate Change and Livelihood Vulnerability of the Local Population on Sagar Island, India[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2019, 20(3): 417-436. doi: 10.1007/s11769-019-1042-2
Citation: MUKHERJEE Nabanita, SIDDIQUE Giyasuddin, BASAK Aritra, ROY Arindam, MANDAL Mehedi Hasan. Climate Change and Livelihood Vulnerability of the Local Population on Sagar Island, India[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2019, 20(3): 417-436. doi: 10.1007/s11769-019-1042-2

Climate Change and Livelihood Vulnerability of the Local Population on Sagar Island, India

doi: 10.1007/s11769-019-1042-2
More Information
  • Corresponding author: MUKHERJEE Nabanita. E-mail:nabanita.mkj@gmail.com
  • Received Date: 2018-05-04
  • Publish Date: 2019-06-27
  • This paper attempts to assess the vulnerability to climate change of human communities in selected mouzas of Sagar Island, South 24 Parganas District of India. A primary household survey has been conducted to collect data on socio-demographic profile, livelihood strategy, health, food, water, social network, natural disaster and climate variation indicators, were selected for Livelihood Vulnerability Index (LVI) and Livelihood Vulnerability Index-Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (LVI-IPCC) analyses to measure and compare the vulnerability of mouzas (administrative unit) currently suffering from frequent flooding, coastal erosion and embankment breaching on an annual basis. Secondary data collected from the Indian Meteorological Department, the Water Resources Information System of India and the Global Sea Level Observing System have been used to identify dynamics of climate change by employing statistical and Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques. A GPS survey has been conducted to identify locations of embankment breaching, and satellite images obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and U.S. Geological Survey (NASA USGS) Government website have been applied to shoreline and land use change detection, using a supervised maximum likelihood classification. The results indicate that the study area has experienced increasing temperature, changing precipitation patterns, rise in sea level, higher storm surges, shoreline change, constant land loss, embankment breaching and changing land use, which have had impact on vulnerability, particularly of poorer people. The LVI (0.48 to 0.68) and LVI-IPCC (0.04 to 0.14) scores suggest that the populations of Dhablat, Bankimnagar, Sumatinagar, Muri Ganga and Sibpur mouzas are highly vulnerable (LVI scores of 0.60 to 0.68 and LVI-IPCC scores of 0.11 to 0.14) to climate change both because the communities are more exposed to it, and because poor access to food, health facilities and water makes them extremely sensitive to it and lowers their adaptive capacity. The findings of this study could be crucial to framing further development and adaptation strategies relating to climate change, and to safeguarding the estuarine ecosystem and the vulnerable population.
  • [1] Abson D J, Dougill A J, Stringer L C, 2012. Using principal component analysis for information-rich socio-ecological vul-nerability mapping in Southern Africa. Applied Geography, 35(1-2):515-524. doi: 10.1016/j.apgeog.2012.08.004
    [2] Adger W N, 1999. Social vulnerability to climate change and extremes in coastal Vietnam. World Development, 27(2):249-269. doi: 10.1016/S0305-750X(98)00136-3
    [3] Adger W N, 2006. Vulnerability. Global Environmental Change, 16(3):268-281. doi: 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2006.02.006
    [4] Adger W N, Dessai S, Goulden M et al., 2009. Are there social limits to adaptation to climate change? Climatic Change, 93(3-4):335-354. doi: 10.1007/s10584-008-9520-z
    [5] Alam G M M, 2016. An Assessment of the Livelihood Vulnerability of the Riverbank Erosion Hazard and its Impact on Food Security for Rural Households in Bangladesh. Australia:Uni-versity of Southern Queensland.
    [6] Alam G M M, 2017. Livelihood cycle and vulnerability of rural households to climate change and hazards in Bangladesh. En-vironmental Management, 59(5):777-791. doi: 10.1007/s00267-017-0826-3
    [7] Alston M, 2014. Gender mainstreaming and climate change. Women's Studies International Forum, 47:287-294. doi: 10.1016/j.wsif.2013.01.016
    [8] Arvai J, Bridge G, Dolsak N et al., 2006. Adaptive management of the global climate problem:bridging the gap between climate research and climate policy. Climatic Change, 78(1):217-225. doi: 10.1007/s10584-006-9094-6
    [9] Bandyopadhyay S, 1997. Natural environmental hazards and their management:a case study of Sagar Island, India. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography, 18(1):20-45. doi: 10.1111/1467-9493.00003
    [10] Census of India, 2011. District Census Handbook South Twenty Four Parganas. West Bengal:Directorate of Census Opera-tions.
    [11] Chambers R, Conway G R, 1992. IDS discussion paper; 296:sustainable rural livelihoods:practical concepts for the 21st century. Available at https://www.ids.ac.uk/publication/sustainable-rural-livelihoods-practical-concepts-for-the-21st-century. 2018-06-11.
    [12] Chowdhury A N, Mondal R, Brahma A et al., 2008. Eco-psychiatry and environmental conservation:study from Sundarban Delta, India. Environmental Health Insights, 2:61-76.
    [13] Church J A, Clark P U, Cazenave A et al., 2013. Sea level change. In:Stocker T F, Qin D, Plattner G K et al. (eds). Climate Change 2013. The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change. New York, USA:Cambridge University Press, 1137-1216.
    [14] Climate Central, 2018. Surging seas risk zone map. Available at https://ss2.climatecentral.org/#8/22.121/88.693?show=satellite&projections=1-K14_RCP85-Flood20pct&level=5&unit=feet&pois=hide. 2018-04-15.
    [15] Cutter S L, 1996. Vulnerability to environmental hazards. Progress in Human Geography, 20(4):529-539. doi: 10.1177/030913259602000407
    [16] Cutter S L, Mitchell J T, Scott M S, 2000. Revealing the vulnera-bility of people and places:a case study of Georgetown county, South Carolina. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 90(4):713-737. doi: 10.1111/0004-5608.00219
    [17] Cutter S L, Boruff B J, Shirley W L, 2003. Social vulnerability to environmental hazards. Social Science Quarterly, 84(2):242-261. doi: 10.1111/1540-6237.8402002
    [18] Dankelman I, 2010. Climate change, human security and gender. In:Dankelman I (ed). Gender and Climate Change:An Intro-duction. London:Earthscan.
    [19] Das P, Das A, Roy S, 2016. Shrimp fry (meen) farmers of Sundarban Mangrove Forest (India):a tale of ecological damage and economic hardship. International Journal of Agricultural and Food Research, 5(2):28-41. doi:10.24102/ijafr. v5i2.683
    [20] Denton F, Wilbanks T J, Abeysinghe A C et al., 2014. Cli-mate-resilient pathways:adaptation, mitigation, and sustainable development. In:Field C B, Barros V R, Dokken D J et al. (eds). Climate Change 2014:Impacts, Adaptation, and Vul-nerability. Part A:Global and Sectoral Aspects. Contribution of Working Group Ⅱ to the Fifth Assessment Report of the In-tergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge:Cam-bridge University Press, 1101-1131.
    [21] Dow K, 1992. Exploring differences in our common future(s):the meaning of vulnerability to global environmental change. Geoforum, 23(3):417-436. doi:10.1016/0016-7185(92) 90052-6
    [22] Earth Explorer, USGS, 2018. USGS-science for a changing world. Available at https://earthexplorer.usgs.gov. 2017-01-15.
    [23] Ebi K, Kovats R S, Menne B, 2006. An approach for assessing human health vulnerability and public health interventions to adapt to climate change. Environmental Health Perspectives, 114(12):1930-1934. doi: 10.1289/ehp.8430
    [24] Ericksen P, Thornton P, Notenbaert A et al., 2011. Mapping hotspots of climate change and food insecurity in the global tropics. In:CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security. CCAFS Report 5. www.ccafs.cgiar.org. Cited 10 February 2018
    [25] Eriksen S H, Kelly P M, 2007. Developing credible vulnerability indicators for climate adaptation policy assessment. Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, 12(4):495-524. doi: 10.1007/s11027-006-3460-6
    [26] Etwire P M, Al-Hassan R M, Kuwornu J K M et al., 2013. Application of livelihood vulnerability index in assessing vulnerability to climate change and variability in Northern Ghana. Journal of Environment and Earth Science, 3(2):157-170.
    [27] FAO, 2007. The state of food and agriculture. In:Food and Agri-cultural Organization of the United Nations, Rome. Available at http://www.fao.org/docrep/010/a1200e/a1200e00.html. 2017-06-05.
    [28] Ford J D, Smit B, 2004. A framework for assessing the vulnera-bility of communities in the Canadian Arctic to risks associated with climate change. Arctic Institute of North America, 57(4):389-400. doi: 10.14430/arctic516
    [29] Fraser E D G, Dougill A J, Hubacek K et al., 2011. Assessing vulnerability to climate change in dryland livelihood systems:conceptual challenges and interdisciplinary solutions. Ecology and Society, 16(3):3. doi: 10.5751/ES-03402-160303
    [30] Füssel H M, 2007. Vulnerability:a generally applicable conceptual framework for climate change research. Global Environmental Change, 17(2):155-167. doi:10.1016/j.gloenvcha. 2006.05.002
    [31] Füssel H M, 2010. How inequitable is the global distribution of responsibility, capability, and vulnerability to climate change:a comprehensive indicator-based assessment. Global Envi-ronmental Change, 20(4):597-611. doi:10.1016/j.gloenvcha. 2010.07.009
    [32] Gbetibouo G A, Ringler C, 2009. Mapping South African farming Sector Vulnerability to Climate Change and Variability:a Subnational Assessment. Washington, DC:Environment and Production Technology Division, International Food Policy Research Institute.
    [33] Gbetibouo G A, Ringler C, Hassan R, 2010. Vulnerability of the South African farming sector to climate change and variability:an indicator approach. Natural Resources Forum, 34(3):175-187. doi: 10.1111/j.1477-8947.2010.01302.x
    [34] Ghosh A, 2012. Living with Changing Climate Impact, Vulnera-bility and Adaptation Challenges in Indian Sundarbans. New Delhi:Centre for Science and Environment.
    [35] Global Sea Level Observing System, 1948-2013. GLOSS data. Available at http://www.gloss-sealevel.org/data/. 2018-04-15.
    [36] Gopinath G, Seralathan P, 2005. Rapid erosion of the coast of Sagar Island, West Bengal - India. Environmental Geology, 48(8):1058-1067. doi: 10.1007/s00254-005-0044-9
    [37] Gopinath G, 2010. Critical coastal issues of Sagar Island, east coast of India. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 160(1-4):555-561. doi: 10.1007/s10661-008-0718-3
    [38] Hahn M B, Riederer A M, Foster S O, 2009. The livelihood vul-nerability index:a pragmatic approach to assessing risks from climate variability and change-a case study in Mozambique. Global Environmental Change, 19(1):74-88. doi: 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2008.11.002
    [39] Hajra R, Ghosh A, Ghosh T, 2017. Comparative assessment of morphological and landuse/landcover change pattern of Sagar, Ghoramara, and Mousani island of Indian Sundarban delta through remote sensing. In:Hazra S, Mukhopadhyay A, Ghosh A R et al. (eds). Environment and Earth Observation. Cham:Springer, 153-172. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-46010-9_11
    [40] Hallegatte S, Green C, Nicholls R J et al., 2013. Future flood losses in major coastal cities. Nature Climate Change, 3(9):802-806. doi: 10.1038/nclimate1979
    [41] Hazra S, Ghosh T, DasGupta R et al., 2002. Sea level and associ-ated changes in the Sundarbans. Science and Culture, 68(9- 12):309-321.
    [42] Hondula D M, Balling Jr R C, Vanos J K et al., 2015. Rising temperatures, human health, and the role of adaptation. Current Climate Change Report, 1(3):144-154. doi: 10.1007/s40641-015-0016-4
    [43] India Water Portal, 1901-2002. Met data, Government of India. https://www.indiawaterportal.org/met_data/. 2016-07-16.
    [44] Indian Meteorological Department, 1901-2017. Ministry of earth sciences, Government of India. Available at http://www.imd.gov.in/Welcome%20To%20IMD/Welcome.php. 2016-05-06.
    [45] International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Soci-eties, 2009. India:Cyclone AILA. In:Information Bulletin. Available at http://www.ifrc.org/docs/appeals/rpts09/Incy29050902.pdf. 2017-01-15.
    [46] Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 2014. Cli-mate Change 2014:Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability, Contribution of Working Group Ⅱ to the Fifth Assessment Re-port of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge, UK:Cambridge University Press.
    [47] Kemp A C, Dutton A, Raymo M E, 2015. Paleo constraints on future sea-level rise. Current Climate Change Reports, 1(3):205-215. doi: 10.1007/s40641-015-0014-6
    [48] Kundu S, Mondal A, Khare D et al., 2014. Shifting shoreline of Sagar Island Delta, India. Journal of Maps, 10(4):612-619. doi: 10.1080/17445647.2014.922131
    [49] Kundu S, Khare D, Mondal A, 2017. Interrelationship of precipi-tation, temperature and reference evapotranspiration trends and their net response to the climate change in Central India. Theoretical and Applied Climatology, 130(3-4):879-900. doi: 10.1007/s00704-016-1924-5
    [50] Mandal S, Choudhury B U, 2015. Estimation and prediction of maximum daily precipitation at Sagar Island using best fit probability models. Theoretical and Applied Climatology, 121(1-2):87-97. doi: 10.1007/s00704-014-1212-1
    [51] Mandal S, Satpati L N, Choudhury B U et al., 2018. Climate change vulnerability to agrarian ecosystem of small island:evi-dence from Sagar Island, India. Theoretical and Applied Clima-tology, 132(1-2):451-464. doi: 10.1007/s00704-017-2098-5
    [52] Milly P C D, Dunne K A, Vecchia A V, 2005. Global pattern of trends in streamflow and water availability in a changing cli-mate. Nature, 438(7066):347-350. doi: 10.1038/nature04312
    [53] Mondal A, Khare D, Kundu S, 2015. Spatial and temporal analysis of precipitation and temperature trend of India. Theoretical and Applied Climatology, 122(1-2):143-158. doi: 10.1007/s00704-014-1283-z
    [54] Mondal I, Bandyopadhyay J, Dhara S, 2017. Detecting shoreline changing trends using principle component analysis in Sagar Island, West Bengal, India. Spatial Information Research, 25(1):67-73. doi: 10.1007/s41324-016-0076-0
    [55] Mukherjee N, Siddique G, 2018. Climate change and vulnerability assessment in Mousuni Island:south 24 Parganas District. Spatial Information Research, 26(2):163-174. doi: 10.1007/s41324-018-0168-0
    [56] National Statistical Service, 2018. Sample size calculator. In:Australian bureau of statistics. Available at http://www.nss.gov.au/nss/home.nsf/NSS/0A4A642C712719DCCA2571AB00243DC6?opendocument. 2017-01-12.
    [57] Nicholls R J, Cazenave A, 2010. Sea-level rise and its impact on coastal zones. Science, 328(5985):1517-1520. doi: 10.1126/science.1185782
    [58] Palutikof J P, Goodess C M, Guo X, 1994. Climate change, po-tential evapotranspiration and moisture availability in the Mediterranean Basin. International Journal of Climatology, 14(8):853-869. doi: 10.1002/joc.3370140804
    [59] Pandey R, Jha S, 2012. Climate vulnerability index-measure of climate change vulnerability to communities:a case of rural lower Himalaya, India. Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, 17(5):487-506. doi: 10.1007/s11027-011-9338-2
    [60] Pandey V P, Manandhar S, Kazama F, 2014. Climate change vul-nerability assessment. In:Shrestha S, Babel M S, Pandey V P (eds). Climate Change and Water Resources. Boca Raton:CRC Press, 183-208.
    [61] Panthi J, Aryal S, Dahal P et al., 2016. Livelihood vulnerability approach to assessing climate change impacts on mixed agro-livestock smallholders around the Gandaki River Basin in Nepal. Regional Environmental Change, 16(4):1121-1132. doi: 10.1007/s10113-015-0833-y
    [62] Patz J A, Campbell-Lendrum D, Holloway T et al., 2005. Impact of regional climate change on human health. Nature, 438(7066):310-317. doi: 10.1038/nature04188
    [63] Pelling M, 2011. Adaptation to Climate Change:from Resilience to Transformation. England:Routledge.
    [64] Preston B L, Yuen E J, Westaway R M, 2011. Putting vulnerability to climate change on the map:a review of approaches, benefits, and risks. Sustainability Science, 6(2):177-202. doi: 10.1007/s11625-011-0129-1
    [65] Purkait B, 2009. Coastal erosion in response to wave dynamics operative in Sagar Island, Sundarban delta, India. Frontiers of Earth Science in China, 3(1):21-33. doi: 10.1007/s11707-009-0001-0
    [66] Rahman M R, Lateh H, 2017. Climate change in Bangladesh:a spatio-temporal analysis and simulation of recent temperature and precipitation data using GIS and time series analysis model. Theoretical and Applied Climatology, 128(1-2):27-41. doi: 10.1007/s00704-015-1688-3
    [67] Regional Meteorological Centre, 1891-2016. Cyclone e-atlas, Go-vernment of India, 2018. Available at http://www.Rmcc-hennaieatlas.tn.nic.in/login.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fTotalFrequen-cy.aspx. 2018-05-06
    [68] Reiter P, Thomas C J, Atkinson P et al., 2004. Global warming and malaria:a call for accuracy. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 4(6):323-324. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(04)01038-2
    [69] Resio D T, Irish J L, 2015. Tropical cyclone storm surge risk. Current Climate Change Reports, 1(2):74-84. doi: 10.1007/s40641-015-0011-9
    [70] Resurrección B P, 2013. Persistent women and environment link-ages in climate change and sustainable development agendas. Women's Studies International Forum, 40:33-43. doi:10. 1016/j.wsif.2013.03.011
    [71] Sengar R S, Sengar K, 2015. Climate Change Effect on Crop Productivity. Boca Raton:Taylor & Francis Group.
    [72] Shah K U, Dulal H B, Johnson C et al., 2013. Understanding livelihood vulnerability to climate change:applying the live-lihood vulnerability index in Trinidad and Tobago. Geoforum, 47:125-137. doi: 10.1016/j.geoforum.2013.04.004
    [73] Stelzenmüller V, Ellis J R, Rogers S I, 2010. Towards a spatially explicit risk assessment for marine management:assessing the vulnerability of fish to aggregate extraction. Biological Con-servation, 143(1):230-238. doi: 10.1016/j.biocon.2009.10.007
    [74] Sullivan C, 2006. Global change impacts:assessing human vul-nerability at the sub-national scale. Available at http://archive.riversymposium.com/2005/index.php?element=06SullivanCaro-line. 2017-11-13.
    [75] The World Bank, 2014. Building resilience for sustainable devel-opment of the Sundarbans. Available at http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/879351468259748207/pdf/880610REVISED00ns000 Strategy0Report.pdf. 2018-13-12.
    [76] Thuiller W, Lavorel S, Araujo M B et al., 2005. Climate change threats to plant diversity in Europe. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102(23):8245-8250. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0409902102
    [77] Toufique K A, Islam A, 2014. Assessing risks from climate varia-bility and change for disaster-prone zones in Bangladesh. In-ternational Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 10:236-249. doi: 10.1016/j.ijdrr.2014.08.008
    [78] Tubiello F N, 2005. Climate variability and agriculture:perspec-tives on current and future challenges. In:Knight B (ed). Impact of Climate Change, Variability and Weather Fluctuations on Crops and Their Produce Markets. Cambridge.
    [79] Turner Ⅱ B L, Kasperson R E, Matson P A et al., 2003. A frame-work for vulnerability analysis in sustainability science. Pro-ceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 100(14):8074-8079. doi:10.1073/pnas. 1231335100
    [80] USAID, 2007. Famine early warning systems network. Available at http://www.fews.net/. 2007-12-14
    [81] Water Resources Information System of India, 1901-2002. Storm surges with tide. Available at http://india-wris.nrsc.gov.in. 2017-01-15.
    [82] Watts M J, Bohle H G, 1993. The space of vulnerability:the causal structure of hunger and famine. Progress in Human Geog-raphy, 17(1):43-67. doi: 10.1177/030913259301700103
    [83] Wood S A, Jina A S, Jain M et al., 2014. Smallholder farmer cropping decisions related to climate variability across multiple regions. Global Environmental Change, 25:163-172. doi: 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2013.12.011
    [84] World Food Programme, 2007. Vulnerability analysis and map-ping. Available at https://resources.vam.wfp.org/sites/default/files/alnap-wfp-mvam-case-study-2016_0.pdf. 2017-12-24
    [85] Water Resources Information System, India, 1901-2002. Storm surges with tide. Available at http://india-wris.nrsc.gov.in. 2017-01-15
    [86] Watts M, Bohle H G, 1993. The space of vulnerability:the causal structure of hunger and famine. Progress in Human Geogra-phy, 17(1):43-67.
    [87] Wood S A, Jina A S, Jain M et al., 2014. Smallholder farmer cropping decisions related to climate variability across multiple regions. Global Environmental Change, 25:163-172. doi: 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2013.12.011
    [88] World Food Programme, 2007. Vulnerability analysis and map-ping. Available at. http://www.wfp.org/operations/vam/. 2017-12-24
    [89] World Wide Fund for Nature, 2017. Island Shrinking, Sea level Rising. Available via DIALOG. Available at http://climate-energy.blogs.panda.org/2017/10/30/Island-sinking-sea-levels-rising/. 2018-04-15
    [90] Zhang Yuehong, Wu Shaohong, Dai Erfu et al., 2008. Identifica-tion and categorization of climate change risks. Chinese Geographical Science, 18(3):268-275. doi: 10.1007/s11769-008-0268-1
  • 加载中
通讯作者: 陈斌, bchen63@163.com
  • 1. 

    沈阳化工大学材料科学与工程学院 沈阳 110142

  1. 本站搜索
  2. 百度学术搜索
  3. 万方数据库搜索
  4. CNKI搜索

Article Metrics

Article views(90) PDF downloads(300) Cited by()

Proportional views
Related

Climate Change and Livelihood Vulnerability of the Local Population on Sagar Island, India

doi: 10.1007/s11769-019-1042-2
    Corresponding author: MUKHERJEE Nabanita. E-mail:nabanita.mkj@gmail.com

Abstract: This paper attempts to assess the vulnerability to climate change of human communities in selected mouzas of Sagar Island, South 24 Parganas District of India. A primary household survey has been conducted to collect data on socio-demographic profile, livelihood strategy, health, food, water, social network, natural disaster and climate variation indicators, were selected for Livelihood Vulnerability Index (LVI) and Livelihood Vulnerability Index-Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (LVI-IPCC) analyses to measure and compare the vulnerability of mouzas (administrative unit) currently suffering from frequent flooding, coastal erosion and embankment breaching on an annual basis. Secondary data collected from the Indian Meteorological Department, the Water Resources Information System of India and the Global Sea Level Observing System have been used to identify dynamics of climate change by employing statistical and Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques. A GPS survey has been conducted to identify locations of embankment breaching, and satellite images obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and U.S. Geological Survey (NASA USGS) Government website have been applied to shoreline and land use change detection, using a supervised maximum likelihood classification. The results indicate that the study area has experienced increasing temperature, changing precipitation patterns, rise in sea level, higher storm surges, shoreline change, constant land loss, embankment breaching and changing land use, which have had impact on vulnerability, particularly of poorer people. The LVI (0.48 to 0.68) and LVI-IPCC (0.04 to 0.14) scores suggest that the populations of Dhablat, Bankimnagar, Sumatinagar, Muri Ganga and Sibpur mouzas are highly vulnerable (LVI scores of 0.60 to 0.68 and LVI-IPCC scores of 0.11 to 0.14) to climate change both because the communities are more exposed to it, and because poor access to food, health facilities and water makes them extremely sensitive to it and lowers their adaptive capacity. The findings of this study could be crucial to framing further development and adaptation strategies relating to climate change, and to safeguarding the estuarine ecosystem and the vulnerable population.

MUKHERJEE Nabanita, SIDDIQUE Giyasuddin, BASAK Aritra, ROY Arindam, MANDAL Mehedi Hasan. Climate Change and Livelihood Vulnerability of the Local Population on Sagar Island, India[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2019, 20(3): 417-436. doi: 10.1007/s11769-019-1042-2
Citation: MUKHERJEE Nabanita, SIDDIQUE Giyasuddin, BASAK Aritra, ROY Arindam, MANDAL Mehedi Hasan. Climate Change and Livelihood Vulnerability of the Local Population on Sagar Island, India[J]. Chinese Geographical Science, 2019, 20(3): 417-436. doi: 10.1007/s11769-019-1042-2
Reference (90)

Catalog

    /

    DownLoad:  Full-Size Img  PowerPoint
    Return
    Return